badcops, $oldiers, drugs & crime

2 miami officers charged in fbi corruption probe
from ap: Two veteran police officers were charged Friday with providing protection for purported shipments of cocaine and stolen goods in what was actually an undercover FBI operation. Officer Geovani Nunez and Detective Jorge Hernandez are accused in court documents of helping protect shipments of what they thought were stolen televisions and computers and at least 12 kilograms of cocaine – sometimes by using their police cars to escort trucks.

soldiers caught in robbery scheme
from atlanta journal-constitution: Four U.S. Army Soldiers who were caught planning a commando-style armed robbery of a purported drug stash house are preparing to plead guilty for their roles in the incident, according to court records and lawyers for the servicemen. The four Soldiers from the Camp Frank D. Merrill mountain training facility in Dahlonega initially were charged with drug conspiracy and weapon offenses after being arrested in January. If convicted, they each faced mandatory minimum prison sentences of at least 15 years.

corruption among chicago cops
from reuters: A former Chicago police officer charged with being part of a ring that falsely arrested and stole from drug dealers has detailed how the operation led to a plot to kill two colleagues, according to interview excerpts released on Friday.

border agents worked on the dark side
border agents worked on the dark sidefrom blue ridge now: The Villarreal investigation is among scores of corruption cases in recent years that have alarmed officials in the Homeland Security Department just as it is hiring thousands of border agents to stem the flow of illegal immigration. The pattern has become familiar: Customs officers wave in vehicles filled with illegal immigrants, drugs or other contraband. A Border Patrol agent acts as a scout for smugglers. Trusted officers fall prey to temptation and begin taking bribes.

minnesota cops can take blood without warrant
from star tribune: When authorities have reason to believe that a drunken driver has caused a serious or fatal accident they have a right to draw the driver’s blood to test its alcohol content without their consent and without a search warrant, the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled Friday State of Minnesota vs. Janet Sue Shriner (220kb PDF). The ruling was greeted with relief by law enforcers.

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